Giant Cell Tumor – The Gym and Running

I recently realized that my left leg is still far weaker than its companion.  That I’ve grown accustomed to allowing the right to carry more than its fair share of the burden.  During my initial recovery from surgery I did physical therapy and then signed up for and started going to a gym.  I continued the gym through the first winter.  Trying to exercise in the cold was difficult, and navigating snow and ice seemed treacherous.  But as soon as spring arrived I told myself that going out for walks and bike rides was sufficient, and I could skip the gym.

Truthfully, I hate the gym.  I don’t hate exercise – I hate the gym.  If I could go to the gym and be alone I’d be fine.  And I recognize that this isn’t the fault of other gym attendees – this is my anxiety, my hangup.   Everyone’s here for the same reason, I tell myself.  No one’s watching you.  No one cares.

I returned to the gym about a week ago.  It was confirmation of how weak my leg is.  On many of the machines, my left leg can only handle half – or even less – of the weight that my right can.  And it’s not just muscle weakness, though that’s profound.  It’s also flexibility.  And it’s pain.  Doing leg lifts with a mere 30 pounds hurts my knee.  It’s not a severe pain, not a pain that’s sufficient to stop me from doing the exercise, but it’s more than enough to acknowledge.

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Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth Redux

Back in 2016 I wrote one post about my battle with SIBO – Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth – and nothing since.  Little did I know then that I’d be diagnosed with a bone tumor and life would change in dramatic ways.

At the time of my post I was seeing a nutritionist who had me on a strict diet regimen, and it appeared that it was working.  However, my weight continued to drop.  I reached 130 pounds.  One of our clients, a doc at a local hospital, expressed extreme concern over my condition, and even asked if I’d had an HIV test.  My clothes hung on me loosely, my face was sunken, my pallor made people uncomfortable.  I looked desperately ill.

My attempts to lead a semi-normal life proved to be dangerous.  I had no reserves, my constitution was nil.  I’d fall out exerting the slightest of efforts – literally nearly collapsing.  I wound up in the hospital after an attempt at a casual mountain bike ride, bonking out and wrecking a mere mile and a half into a trail I used to ride without giving it a second thought.

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Giant Cell Tumor – 17 Months Post-Op

Another 4 months another x-ray, and another bout of scanxiety as I wait for the disc of images to arrive and be analyzed by my doc on the east coast.  The ortho here who diagnosed me took a glance and thinks it looks no different from the last scan, so that’s somewhat of a relief.  I never feel full relief until I hear from the experts though.

Well, honestly, I never feel full relief.  There’s a reason for recurring x-rays far out into the future.

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Giant Cell Tumor and Doctors

Let’s talk for a minute about doctors.

I live in a town of approximately 100,000 people in central Oregon. When I was diagnosed with a bone tumor at one of the two orthopedists in the city, I was straight away handed my file and x-rays and referred out to specialists in Portland, Seattle and even Texas, because there’s literally no one in my hometown who is qualified to treat my GCT. I ultimately chose to have it handled at Shands in Florida, for a variety of reasons; I have family working in that organization who helped fast track my case, I have family in Florida who could put us up and assist with recovery and, most important of all, Shands is a learning hospital that has a surgeon on staff who specializes in rare tumors including GCT.

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Windows 10, NVidia, and Paint Shop Pro

I’m a luddite – I love Paint Shop Pro 9. Yeah, I use Illustrator and Photoshop and Inkscape and Gimp and all that goodness but, in a pinch, PSP9’s been my go-to quick and dirty image manipulator forever.

Then I got a fancy new laptop with a fancy new video card… and PSP9 wouldn’t work. It wouldn’t produce a window on launch, even though I could see it there in the task manager, running. And when I uninstalled and tried to reinstall, it hung for infinity on “registering modules.”

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RW Elephant Inventory WordPress Plugin and Divi

This is an obscure one. I have a client that uses this combination for their business. RW Elephant put out their new plugin v2x rather than update their old v1x plugin, and it’s basically like starting over. Honestly, configuration worked pretty well, but there were some problems. Firstly, it defaulted to full browser width on its primary inventory screens, which looked like poop. This was fixed by heading to their rw-elephant.min.css in wp-content\plugins\rw-elephant-retail-inventory\lib\assets\css and changing the .rwe-inventory margin setting to auto and width to 80% in order to shrink and align the inventory content.

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No-IP DUC (Dynamic Update Client) for Raspberry Pi as a Service

I originally followed No-IP’s instructions for installing their DUC on a Raspberry Pi, and thought things were fine until I discovered upon IP change that updates weren’t. Updating, that is. With a little research I came across this extremely helpful site which outlines how to install the No-IP DUC as a service on Raspbian. Be aware, the instructions start from scratch, assuming that you don’t have the DUC installed yet.

For the bit highlighted above, you’re going to instead want to navigate to whatever the directory is that your DUC installation dir is within. In other words, if the NoIP DUC lives in /home/pi/noip/noip/noip-2.1.9-1 you’re going to want to navigate to /home/pi/noip before pulling down and unpacking that .tar as instructed in line 2/3 there. Other than that, this worked like a champ. Thanks site person!

OpenVPN – Importing OVPN configs in Windows

Turns out that OpenVPN doesn’t store imported .ovpn files in its usual path (meaning, C:\Program Files\OpenVPN\config). Instead it installs them in:

C:\Users\USERNAME\OpenVPN\config\OVPNFILENAME\ovpnfilename.ovpn

At least this is the case for me thus far regarding Windows 10.

VisualCron – Powershell Network Path Truncation

I set up a VisualCron job to kick off a Powershell script to reach out to certain directories – built dynamically from an array – to check for content. The script ran perfectly when invoked manually, but through VisualCron it would error out with a truncated path:

The above path should have been \\atldireng03\e$\download\. I just could not get the path to resolve. The script that builds the path looks similar to this:

Ultimately the issue was one of rights. The account VisualCron was utilizing to invoke the script did not have rights to the administrative share path being built by the script. Change the account to an administrator on the remote server and the script ran like a charm. Now, that it would error out with this weird truncated path problem rather than something referring to a lack of sufficient rights is frustrating. I suppose it’s because it could not ‘see’ the path (hence “it does not exist”), but were you to manually attempt to map to a path you hadn’t rights to pretty much all OSes would return you some kind of informative error about insufficient rights. Not here. And for the record, I haven’t tried running the script manually through a Powershell prompt without rights to the paths to see what happens. It’s entirely probable this uninformative error is on Powershell’s side and not VisualCron.